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Courses available for adjunct faculty

Learning Outcomes for Syllabi (for Area I Core)

In some cases, additional courses may be available if an adjunct faculty member holds the appropriate qualifications.

ENGL 211 — Bible as Literature

ENGL 213 — African-American Literature

ENGL 216 — Cultural Exchange in Transnational Literature

ENGL 217 — Mythology

ENGL 257 — Survey of Western World Literature I

Students who successfully complete this course should be able to demonstrate the skills and knowledge listed below.

1. Knowledge of European authors and their works within the literary periods covered

  • A basic understanding of European life and literature during the Classical Period (Ancient Greece and Rome), Medieval Period, and the Renaissance.
  • A familiarity with selected authors from each period; a familiarity with selected works in a variety of genres from each period.

2. Communication Skills

  • The ability to use both spoken and written language in interpreting literary works and discussing their significance.

3. Critical Thinking/Literary Skills

  • The ability to analyze literature with attention to style and form as well as to content.
  • Self-awareness as a reader. An understanding of the assumptions, advantages, and limitations of one’s own approach to literature.
  • An understanding of important literary concepts (e.g., influence, intention, ideology, genre, convention, rhetoric, irony, sentimentality, figurative language, canonicity) and of the basic terminology used to discuss poetry, prose, and drama.
  • An understanding of how literature from other times, other places, and other cultures might—or might not—be meaningful to us today.

ENGL 258 — Survey of Western World Literature II

Students who successfully complete this course should be able to demonstrate the skills and knowledge listed below.

1. Knowledge of European authors and their works within the literary periods covered

  • A basic understanding of European life and literature during the Enlightenment (Eighteen Century), Nineteenth Century (Realism/Naturalism), and the Twentieth Century (Modernism).
  • A familiarity with selected authors from each period; a familiarity with selected works in a variety of genres from each period.

2. Communication Skills

  • The ability to use both spoken and written language in interpreting literary works and discussing their significance.

3. Critical Thinking/Literary Skills

  • The ability to analyze literature with attention to style and form as well as to content.
  • Self-awareness as a reader. An understanding of the assumptions, advantages, and limitations of one’s own approach to literature.
  • An understanding of important literary concepts (e.g., influence, intention, ideology, genre, convention, rhetoric, irony, sentimentality, figurative language, canonicity) and of the basic terminology used to discuss poetry, prose, and drama.
  • An understanding of how literature from other times, other places, and other cultures might—or might not—be meaningful to us today.

ENGL 267 — Survey of British Literature to 1790

Students who successfully complete this course should be able to demonstrate the skills and knowledge listed below.

1. Knowledge of British authors and their works within the literary periods covered

  • A basic understanding of British life and literature during the Old and Middle English periods, the Renaissance, the Restoration, and the Eighteenth Century.
  • A familiarity with selected authors from each period; a familiarity with selected works in a variety of genres from each period.

2. Communication Skills

  • The ability to use both spoken and written language in interpreting literary works and discussing their significance.

3. Critical Thinking/Literary Skills

  • The ability to analyze literature with attention to style and form as well as to content.
  • Self-awareness as a reader. An understanding of the assumptions, advantages, and limitations of one’s own approach to literature.
  • An understanding of important literary concepts (e.g., influence, intention, ideology, genre, convention, rhetoric, irony, sentimentality, figurative language, canonicity) and of the basic terminology used to discuss poetry, prose, and drama.
  • An understanding of how literature from other times, other places, and other cultures might—or might not—be meaningful to us today.

ENGL 268 Survey of British Literature 1790 to Present

Students who successfully complete this course should be able to demonstrate the skills and knowledge listed below.

1. Knowledge of British authors and their works within the literary periods covered

  • A basic understanding of British life and literature during the Romantic period, the Victorian period, and the Twentieth Century.
  • A familiarity with selected authors from each period; a familiarity with selected works in a variety of genres from each period.

2. Communication Skills

  • The ability to use both spoken and written language in interpreting literary works and discussing their significance.

3. Critical Thinking/Literary Skills

  • The ability to analyze literature with attention to style and form as well as to content.
  • Self-awareness as a reader. An understanding of the assumptions, advantages, and limitations of one’s own approach to literature.
  • An understanding of important literary concepts (e.g., influence, intention, ideology, genre, convention, rhetoric, irony, sentimentality, figurative language, canonicity) and of the basic terminology used to discuss poetry, prose, and drama.
  • An understanding of how literature from other times, other places, and other cultures might—or might not—be meaningful to us today.

ENGL 277 Survey of American Literature: Beginning to the Civil War

Students who successfully complete this course should be able to demonstrate the skills and knowledge listed below.

1. Knowledge of American authors and their works within the literary periods covered

  • A basic understanding of American life and literature during the periods of discovery, settlement, revolution, and early nation-building.
  • A familiarity with selected authors from each period; a familiarity with selected works in a variety of genres from each period.

2. Communication Skills

  • The ability to use both spoken and written language in interpreting literary works and discussing their significance.

3. Critical Thinking/Literary Skills

  • The ability to analyze literature with attention to style and form as well as to content.
  • Self-awareness as a reader. An understanding of the assumptions, advantages, and limitations of one’s own approach to literature.
  • An understanding of important literary concepts (e.g., influence, intention, ideology, genre, convention, rhetoric, irony, sentimentality, figurative language, canonicity) and of the basic terminology used to discuss poetry, prose, and drama.
  • An understanding of how literature from other times, other places, and other cultures might—or might not—be meaningful to us today.

ENGL 278 — Survey of American Literature: Civil War to Present

Students who successfully complete this course should be able to demonstrate the skills and knowledge listed below.

1. Knowledge of American authors and their works within the literary periods covered

  • A basic understanding of American life and literature during the periods of literary realism, naturalism, modernism, and post-modernism.
  • A familiarity with selected authors from each period; a familiarity with selected works in a variety of genres from each period.

2. Communication Skills

  • The ability to use both spoken and written language in interpreting literary works and discussing their significance.

3. Critical Thinking/Literary Skills

  • The ability to analyze literature with attention to style and form as well as to content.
  • Self-awareness as a reader. An understanding of the assumptions, advantages, and limitations of one’s own approach to literature.
  • An understanding of important literary concepts (e.g., influence, intention, ideology, genre, convention, rhetoric, irony, sentimentality, figurative language, canonicity) and of the basic terminology used to discuss poetry, prose, and drama.
  • An understanding of how literature from other times, other places, and other cultures might—or might not—be meaningful to us today.

HUM 207 — Introduction to Humanities I

Students who successfully complete this course should be able to demonstrate the skills and knowledge listed below.

1. Knowledge of works from the humanities, that is, expressions of human imagination and creativity, in Western culture from early cultures of the Mediterranean through the European Middle Ages.

  • A familiarity with selected works of the imagination drawn from the visual, musical, theatrical, and literary arts.
  • A familiarity with the social and historical contexts that produced these works.

2. Communication skills

  • The ability to use both spoken and written language in interpreting works of the imagination and discussing their significance.

3. Critical Thinking

  • The ability to identify similarities and differences in the ways the different art forms express ideas and values.
  • The ability to understand and appreciate the complexity of the arts in presenting ideas.

4. Cultural Perspective

  • The ability to analyze these works and see them in the broader context of the cultures that produced them.
  • An increasing self-awareness as reader, viewer, and listener in understanding the assumptions of the culture from which the student comes.
  • An understanding of the ways in which works of the imagination reflect their culture, or sub-culture, and the limits of that “reflection.”
  • An understanding of how these works of art from other times, places, and cultures might, or might not, be meaningful to us today.

HUM 208 — Introduction to Humanities II

Students who successfully complete this course should be able to demonstrate the skills and knowledge listed below.

1. Knowledge of works from the humanities, that is, expressions of human imagination and creativity, in Western culture from the Renaissance to the present.

  • A familiarity with selected works of the imagination drawn from the visual, musical, theatrical, and literary arts.
  • A familiarity with the social and historical contexts that produced these works.

2. Communication skills

  • The ability to use both spoken and written language in interpreting works of the imagination and discussing their significance.

3. Critical Thinking

  • The ability to identify similarities and differences in the ways the different art forms express ideas and values.
  • The ability to understand and appreciate the complexity of the arts in presenting ideas.

4. Cultural Perspective

  • The ability to analyze these works and see them in the broader context of the cultures that produced them.
  • An increasing self-awareness as reader, viewer, and listener in understanding the assumptions of the culture from which the student comes.
  • An understanding of the ways in which works of the imagination reflect their culture, or sub-culture, and the limits of that “reflection.”
  • An understanding of how these works of art from other times, places, and cultures might, or might not, be meaningful to us today.