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Current Student Handbook

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Financial Support and Academic Resources

Graduate Assistantships for continuing students

Continuing Students with Graduate Assistantships:

If you are a continuing student in the M.A. in English program, we already have your application materials and are able to review your transcript, but you will need to reapply for your second year. In your reappointment letter, you will be asked to address your degree progress and your goals as an instructor. Each year, more specific guidelines are given as the kinds of TAship configurations we are able to offer change. Please see the MA director or the First-Year Writing Program director for further information.

Travel Awards for Students in the Master of Arts in English Program

The English Department has allocated funds for M.A., M.F.A., and M.A.T.C. graduate student travel to academic conferences. These funds are intended to help students gain professional experience through participation in regional or national professional organizations, as well as attend appropriate student conferences relevant to the student’s area of study.

There are four types of Graduate Travel Awards:

  • Up to $200, per student, can be awarded to attend a conference without presenting a paper.
  • Up to $300, per student, can be awarded for any conference in the region: Idaho, Oregon, Washington, Montana, Wyoming, and Utah.
  • Up to $300, per student, can be awarded for any graduate conference outside the region.
  • Up to $500, per student, can be awarded for any national or international conference outside the region.

To be considered for certain categories of the Graduate Travel Award, students must:

  • Be presenting a paper, conducting a workshop, or be a panel member at a conference.
  • Have received an official acceptance letter from the conference organizer(s).
  • Have a graduate GPA of 3.0 or higher.
  • Be accepted, or enrolled, in the M.A. program.
  • Be graduating after the conference is held.
  • Give or e-mail the Director of the M.A. in English a copy of the acceptance letter, and a single spaced, 200-500 word abstract of the accepted paper, workshop, or panel.

Important points to keep in mind:

  • Preference may be given to students with 18, or more, graduate credits.
  • Graduate Travel Awards are disbursed as reimbursement after the student has attended the conference.
  • The deadline for application is four (4) weeks before the conference date/date of departure.

The Director recommends applying as far in advance as possible. Funds may be exhausted by late in the academic year.

To apply for a graduate student travel award, send the Director of the M.A. in English an email including the following information: 1.) Your acceptance letter from the conference at which you are either presenting or attending.  2.) Information on the conference.  3.) A single spaced, 200-500 word abstract of the accepted paper, workshop, or panel.

To Thesis or Not To Thesis: Choosing Your Culminating Activity

Students who are pursuing an M.A. in English as a stepping stone to further graduate work in English should give serious consideration to undertaking a thesis or portfolio as their culminating activity for the M.A. degree.  Other options include additional coursework (two additional elective courses) for students pursuing the M.A. in English, Literature.  The thesis or portfolio is, ultimately, a massive independent study and to succeed in producing a thesis or project a good deal of self-motivation and self-discipline is a prerequisite.  If you are not already good at setting deadlines for yourself and forcing yourself to stick to those self-imposed deadlines you will need to develop mechanisms for doing so in order to complete a successful thesis or project.

Culminating Activity Options

ENGL 591 Project

A project focuses on applied research, usually in the area  Rhetoric and Composition. The research is published in a document of 60-80 pages of text, including bibliography. In the semester before you plan to register for Project, work with the proposed director of your project to prepare a prospectus and set up a Project committee. Directions for preparing a prospectus are available from the M.A. Director (see hanging folders outside the M.A. Director’s office). See also, ENGL 595 Readings and Conference, below.

To register, do the following:

  1. Email the English Department office (english@boisestate.edu) the number of credits and the name of the faculty member directing your project, and you will be emailed a class number and permission number (if needed).
  2. Log in to BroncoWeb and use the class number to search for and then add the class. The usual deadline for this is the 10th class day of the semester, but it is wise to consult the Schedule of Classes to be certain of that semester’s timeline.

Note on grading: If project is not completed during the semester for which a student has enrolled in ENGL 591, the instructor must submit a grade of IP (In Progress). When the project is completed and the student has passed the project defense, the instructor then submits a letter grade on a Change of Grade card (available from the department office).

ENGL 592 Portfolio

Like a thesis or project, a portfolio is normally completed during the student’s last semester.  The following are the guidelines for both the portfolio in Literature and in Rhetoric and Composition, respectively.

MA in Literature Portfolio Option

For students pursuing the M.A. in English, Literature, two distinct portfolio options exist:
1) A Research and Professional Publication Portfolio or
2) A Research and Teaching Portfolio.
Details of these options appear below:

M.A. in Literature Research and Professional Publication Portfolio option
1.)  Select a Committee:  Students will have a supervisory committee of three student-selected faculty members (one chair and two advisors/readers) appropriate to the subject area. Ideally, the committee should be familiar with the student’s work. In addition, the student must pass an oral defense of the portfolio contents with their selected committee members. The student is obligated to set up a timetable of projected due dates with her/his committee in order to chart the progress of the portfolio.  The committee members guide the student in writing and revising the scholarly papers and other parts of the Portfolio; the student should consult with them early and often.

2.)  Early in the first semester of the second year of study, the student will put together a prospectus and annotated bibliographies for his or her portfolio.  Students should send a draft of their annotated bibliographies and portfolio prospectus to members of their committee at least one week before the committee is scheduled to vote on approving the prospectus.  Committee members may make suggestions for revision and for additional entries for the annotated bibliography.

Prospectus: The prospectus will be 8-10 pages long.  In it the student will introduce the pieces he or she plans to produce/research; explain why he or she chose those pieces and how those pieces fit into his or her overall academic and professional goals; and outline further research the student will conduct in order to complete the portfolio materials.
Annotated Bibliographies: The student will compile one or two annotated bibliographies totaling at least thirty sources or approximately fifteen for each piece.

3.)  Write and carefully revise a reflective introductory essay of 10-15 pages describing the major ideas, themes, and issues presented in the two portfolio pieces along with the context of the pieces within the field, and the research avenues pursued.   This essay should include analysis of the overarching interconnectedness of the two essays.  This essay is presented to the committee, along with the annotated bibliographies, prior to the due date of the final portfolio.

4.)  Write and carefully revise one 10-12 page conference presentation paper and one 25-30 page scholarly research essay designed for possible publication.  These papers must be tightly focused, deal cogently with major critical issues in the area chosen, and demonstrate hallmarks of good academic writing such as coherence, scholarly citation, mechanical proficiency, and originality as a contribution to the field. It is possible but not required for the two papers to be directly inter-related; that is, the presentation version may focus on aspects of the topic explored more fully in the research essay.

M.A. in Literature Research and Teaching Portfolio option
1.)  Select a committee: Students will have a supervisory committee of three student-selected faculty members (one chair and two advisors/readers) appropriate to the subject matter.  Ideally, the committee should be familiar with the student’s work.  In addition, the student must pass an oral defense of the portfolio contents with their selected committee members.  The student is obligated to set up a timetable of projected due dates with her/his committee in order to chart the progress of the portfolio.  The committee members guide the student in writing and revising the scholarly papers and other parts of the Portfolio; the student should consult with them early and often.

2.)  During the first semester of the second year of study, the student will put together a prospectus and an annotated bibliography for his or her portfolio.  Students should send a draft of their annotated bibliographies and portfolio prospectus to members of their committee at least one week before the committee is scheduled to vote on approving the prospectus.  Committee members may make suggestions for revision and for additional entries for the annotated bibliography.

Prospectus: The prospectus will be 8-10 pages long.  In it the student will introduce the pieces he or she plans to produce/research; explain why he or she chose those pieces and how those pieces fit into his or her overall academic and professional goals; and outline further research the student will conduct in order to complete the portfolio materials.
Annotated Bibliography: The student will compile an annotated bibliography containing approximately 20 sources.

3.)  Write and carefully revise 2 page (maximum) statement of teaching philosophy.

4.)  Write and carefully revise a 10-15 page statement of teaching goals.  This statement should reflect on and articulate the student’s personal pedagogical philosophies, in addition to situating those goals and philosophies within the greater academic dialogue.

5.)  Write and carefully revise a sample syllabus or unit plan for a proposed literature course or unit of your design.  Along with this, you must also submit a statement explaining the choices that went into the creation of the proposed literature course.  This statement should illustrate how the assignments and activities created for the class add to the students’ overall understanding of the subject.

6.)  Write and carefully revise a 15-20 page scholarly paper focused on a pedagogical issue related to the teaching of literature.  The question or questions posed in the paper should contribute to the ongoing academic conversation, as well as demonstrate an effective understanding of major pedagogical theories related to the subject.

M.A. in Rhetoric and Composition Portfolio Option

The portfolio is one option for culminating activity in the MA in Rhetoric and Composition emphasis. Like a thesis or project, it is normally completed during the student’s last semester. The following gives students and professors rationale and guidelines for the portfolio.

Objectives of the M.A. in Rhetoric and Composition Portfolio

  1. To demonstrate the breadth of a student’s study in rhetoric and composition.
  2. To demonstrate the student’s ability to study a subject in depth and to convey the results of that study in writing.
  3. To demonstrate the student’s ability to contribute to the ongoing conversation among scholars in rhetoric and composition.
  4. To demonstrate the student’s ability to connect his or her study of rhetoric and composition to writing/reading/teaching beyond his or her experience as an MA student.

Procedures

  1. Each student will request a member of the Rhetoric and Composition faculty to serve as chair of the portfolio committee. The chair and the student will work together to choose the other two committee members. Students will work with committee members through the process of portfolio composition, revision, and construction.
  2. Students will meet with the chair of their committee to make plans for completing the portfolio.
  3. Students and chairs are responsible for choosing the content of the portfolio.
  4. Students who are constructing portfolios are encouraged to establish working groups with other students.
  5. Students and chairs should construct and follow a timeline similar to that needed for an MA thesis or project.

Timelines

  1. Complete portfolios must be submitted to committee members no later than two weeks before the last date for thesis and project defense listed in the university graduate catalogue.
  2. Culminating event for the portfolio will be held no later than the university’s last date for thesis and project defense.
  3. All members of a committee must agree that a portfolio passes. If a portfolio fails to receive a majority of passing votes, the student may resubmit the revised portfolio the following semester. See Criteria for Approval below.
  1. Proposal for the Portfolio. The initial portfolio proposal outlines the proposed contents of the portfolio. It includes a brief description of the proposed included works, the rationale for choosing the portfolio option, a time line, and any other agreed-upon elements. The proposal must be approved by the committee before the portfolio work begins. (5-10 pages)

Contents of the MA Portfolio

  • One revised, publishable product (most often a written journal article, although submissions for digital academic journals are also appropriate. Or, an alternative genre may be proposed with the committee’s approval). This product can stem from work done within a graduate seminar, but extensive additional, independent research also needs to be conducted. The original seminar paper should be included with teacher comments. (20-30 pages)
  • One piece suitable for a professional conference presentation, a revision of a different seminar paper (with cover letter and suitable conference submissions indicated). Original seminar paper should be included with teacher comments. (10-15 pages)
  • Bibliographic essay which provides an introduction to research in any area of interest to scholars in rhetoric and composition. (For examples, see reviews in College Composition and Communication as well as Teaching Composition: Twelve Bibliographic Essays, ed. Gary Tate, 1987). (15-20 pages)
  • Teaching materials: students may choose up to ten pages of representative teaching materials including sample course outlines, assignments, responses to student writing, etc., with a brief explanation of how that material reflects their work as scholars in rhetoric and composition. (Up to 10 pages).
  • A statement of intent that clearly articulates an intellectual rationale for selection of portfolio contents, describes the process of revision, provides a retrospective on the portfolio and its intellectual coherence, and indicates a future direction for writing. (4-5 pages)

Criteria for Approval

  1. Has the publishable seminar paper been revised substantially? Is it suitable for submission to a journal or to be included in an application dossier for a job or further graduate study? Does it demonstrate audience awareness, knowledge of the conventions of academic discourse, and breadth and depth of knowledge about the subject?
  2. Has the conference paper been revised substantially from its original form as a (different) seminar paper? Is it suitable for presentation at a professional conference? Does it demonstrate audience awareness, knowledge of the rhetorical situation of conference paper presentation, and breadth and depth of knowledge about the subject?
  3. Does the student make clear how the bibliographic essay connects with other work in the portfolio and with the student’s goals for further study or employment? Is it substantial and thorough? Is the form correct?
  4. Do the teaching materials indicate the student’s role as a specialist in rhetoric and composition? Do they demonstrate reflective teaching? Are they appropriate for inclusion in an application dossier for further graduate study or for a teaching job?
  5. Does the statement of intent explain why materials in the portfolio are included, discuss the process of revision, explain the portfolio’s coherence as a complete piece of writing, and discuss the student’s further goals?

Culminating Event: Public Presentation

  1. Student will present one portion of the portfolio, such as the conference paper, to an audience as part of the evaluation process. The presentation welcomes the student as a professional colleague.
  2. Student will discuss the portfolio with the committee and interested others.
  3. As is done with the thesis and portfolio, the committee will recess privately to decide whether the portfolio is approved.
  4. Committee will report back to student privately and sign the necessary forms.

ENGL 593 Thesis

A thesis presents the results of original research in a series of chapters totaling 60 to 80 pages, including a bibliography of relevant work. In the semester before you plan to register for Thesis, work with your proposed director of the project to prepare a prospectus and set up a Thesis committee. Directions for preparing a prospectus are available from the M.A. Director (see hanging folders outside the M.A. Director’s office). See also, ENGL 595 Readings and Conference, below.

To register, do the following:

  1. Email the English Office (english@boisestate.edu) the number of credits and the name of the faculty member directing your thesis committee, and you will be emailed a class number and permission number (if needed).
  2. Log in to BroncoWeb and use the class number to find and add your section. The usual deadline for this is the 10th class day of the semester, but it is wise to consult the Schedule of Classes to be certain of that semester’s timeline.

Note on grading: If thesis is not completed during the semester for which a student has enrolled in ENGL 593, the instructor must submit a grade of IP (In Progress). When the thesis is completed and the student has passed the thesis defense, the instructor then submits a letter grade on a Change of Grade card (available from the department office).

When to start

You should begin thinking about what culminating activity you intend to pursue from early on in your program.  If you decide to undertake a Thesis, Portfolio, or Project, it is likewise a good idea to begin thinking about possible topics and beginning the process of identifying a Supervisory Committee Chair as early as your first semester of coursework.  Students pursuing the M.A. full time (nine or more credit hours per semester) will typically complete the degree in four semesters, so ultimately this is not a very long time.  You will make the process of researching and writing your culminating activity easier if you begin thinking about the it and some of the preliminary steps as early as your first semester in the program.

How to choose your topic

Because a culminating activity topic is something you are going to live with and be caught up thinking, reading, and writing about for a considerable length of time, you should choose carefully and wisely and involve the advice of your instructors and advisor from an early stage.  The first and most obvious criteria is that the topic should interest you; as you are developing individual paper/assignment topics for your coursework, think about ways the discreet questions and issues you are pursuing in those projects might be part of a larger study or contribute to the analysis of a larger issue.  Start with authors, texts, and/or ideas that move you and about which you feel you may have something original to contribute.  Generate a list of inter-related questions about those topics/works that you feel need to be answered.  Generate also a list of key terms that are related to those questions and use those as search terms to identify secondary materials that analyze the primary (or related) text/topics that are at the core of your study.  As you read the existing scholarship related to your ideas refine and revise your questions and begin to articulate a central question that you feel has been left unaddressed by other scholars and, in turn, begin to develop a speculative answer to that question.  Talk to your advisor or professors teaching graduate level courses in the specialty area that most closely relates to your potential topic and ask them for feedback on your tentative ideas, suggestions for additional keywords, or even particular suggestions on further reading of either primary or secondary materials for your proposed topic.  You might consider browsing past M.A. in English theses held in Albertsons Library to get a better feel for the general scope and nature of an M.A. thesis.

Who to contact

Start local.  If, as advised above, you have begun thinking about your culminating activity early in the course of your program you may not yet know many of the professors or what their particular areas of research interest and expertise are.  Make an appointment with the Director of the M.A. in English (who serves as default advisor to all M.A. in English students)  to talk about your preliminary ideas and to seek advice on who among the faculty might provide a good fit for supervising such a project or be able to give advice on next steps or further reading.  If you are taking a class and have an idea for a research project that you suspect might have the potential to become a culminating activity centered on materials or ideas from that class, make an appointment to meet with that faculty member and discuss your preliminary ideas.

Involving your advisor, setting up your supervisory committee

Once you have identified a topic you will hopefully also have a good idea of who the most obvious member/s of the faculty will be to supervise your culminating activity.  In consultation with that person and or the Director of the M.A. in English you will need to recruit two additional faculty members to serve on your Supervisory Committee.  Ideally these will be faculty members from whom you have taken classes and who know your work and/or something about your topic area.  Your Committee Chair will be the principal expert in the sub-area related to your chosen topic and you should choose additional committee members who can help you to sharpen and articulate the originality of your research within the field.  You should aim to set up your supervisory committee ideally by the end of your second semester (for full time students) in the program.

Prospectus Guidelines

Guidelines for writing a Thesis, Project, or Portfolio prospectus can be found here.

Procedures & Paperwork

As a rough guide you should aim to follow the following timetable for pursuing a thesis or topic:

First Semester:
• Identify potential topic and possible supervisor

Second Semester:
• Solidify topic and recruit supervisor; with supervisor establish complete supervisory committee.• File paperwork with the Graduate College establishing your supervisory committee.

Summer:
• Conduct independent research on your thesis topic: read (and re-read) primary texts, identify and read important secondary criticism.

Third Semester:
• Enroll in ENGL 595: Readings & Conference with your thesis or project supervisor as instructor.• Complete a prospectus and one or more chapters of the actual thesis by the end of this semester.• Once approved by your thesis director, distribute prospectus to your supervisory committee.• Schedule a meeting of your supervisory committee to discuss and approve your prospectus.• File paperwork approving your prospectus with the Director of the M.A. in English.• Negotiate a detailed timetable for completion of the thesis/project with your thesis/project supervisor.

Fourth Semester:
• Complete your thesis/project and submit to your supervisor and supervisory committee for revision and comment.• As necessary, revise and re-submit.• Schedule the oral defense of your thesis (note, if you plan to graduate at the end of this fourth semester, be aware of the deadlines set by the Graduate College for defense of theses; in the Spring Semester this deadline typically falls at the end of the week immediately following Spring Break).• After approval by your supervisory committee, complete any additional revisions or corrections required and format and submit your thesis to the graduate college and the Library following the instructions in Boise State University Graduate College’s Standards for Preparation of Dissertations, Theses, and Projects (available at BSU Bookstore).

Individualized Course Work

ENGL 590 Practicum/Internship

This course number is used to earn credit for learning through work in a professional setting. The English Department Internship Coordinator keeps files of available internships. Students may also locate potential internship opportunities on their own or through the suggestion of other faculty members.

To obtain more information, to plan a Practicum/Internship, and to register: Consult the English Department Internship Coordinator, Prof. Jeff Westover, at JeffreyWestover@boisestate.edu.

ENGL 595 Readings and Conference

Students  sometimes enroll in Readings and Conference after they have determined the topic for their culminating activity. Work for this individualized study may include reading in the subject area, researching important bibliographic sources, planning the methodology and organization of the thesis, portfolio, or project, and meeting regularly with the student’s Supervisory Committee Chair. The end goal of ENGL 595 is usually the completion and approval of the student’s thesis, portfolio, or project prospectus (see Prospectus Guidelines, available online and in the hanging folders outside the M.A. in English Director’s office) and some additional completed work for the culminating activity, such as a chapter of the thesis, or one component of the portfolio. The thesis, portfolio, or project chair is the instructor of record for ENGL 595. Consult with your Committee Chair and the M.A. in English program director to determine if ENGL 595 is appropriate for you.

To register, do the following:

  1. Consult with your Supervisory Committee Chair to negotiate the outcomes that will be required for the Readings and Conference
  2. With the help of your Committee Chair, prepare a document to be attached to the Reading and Conference application form that includes the following information:
    • Title/Topic of the proposed Reading and Conference
    • Objective of the Reading and Conference
    • Detailed description of the readings to be done and other work to be completed during the Reading and Conference
  3. Fill out the Application for Reading and Conference form, available online at the Graduate College website, and attach the document described above.
  4. Get the required signatures, from your Committee Chair and from the Director of the M.A. in English program.
  5. Submit the completed Application form to the Boise State University Registrar’s Office.

ENGL 596 Graduate Independent Study

This course number is used by students who want to follow up in an individual way on a subject or author that they have a compelling reason for studying and that is not already covered in a graduate course or as part of a culminating activity. The student should consult with the appropriate faculty member for the study and, if that person’s schedule permits her/him to undertake direction of the study, and if the study makes sense for the student’s degree plan, work out the plan for the readings, writing assignments, and individual meetings. Students must also consult with the M.A. in English program director prior to setting up ENGL 596.

*Note on number of credits: the number of credits for ENGL 595, 596, and 696 is usually 3, that is, the equivalent of the work involved in a 3-credit course. However, the number may be fewer if less work is required, as determined by the professor supervising the study in conjunction with the student undertaking it.  In any case, the M.A. in English degree (thesis/project and coursework options) permits a total of only 3 credits from among the categories ENGL 595 and ENGL 596 (and ENGL 590, for students in the Literature program), to apply toward the degree.

Graduation: What to Do and When to Do It

All graduate students must apply for graduation; simply completing course requirements will not result in a diploma.  Students must begin the process of applying for graduation during their penultimate semester at Boise State.  The first form that must be filed is the Application for Admission to Candidacy, which must contain a signature from the Director of the M.A. in English.  This form must be completed by early July for a December graduation and by early October for a May graduation.  At the beginning of your final semester in the M.A. program, you must apply for graduation by filing the Application for Graduate Degree or Certificate form.  Once you have successfully applied for graduation and submitted all other appropriate forms (such as the Report of Culminating Activity form), you will be eligible to receive your diploma.

Applications for graduation are handled primarily through the offices of the Graduate College, and all necessary forms can be easily obtained from their Website as a PDF document.  The exception to this is the Application for Graduate Degree or Certificate form – this will be your actual formal application for graduation.  This form can be completed on BroncoWeb via your student account, but you may not apply for graduation on BroncoWeb until your Admission to Candidacy form has been approved.

For a detailed breakdown of graduation deadlines and exact dates, please consult academic calendar.

Involvement in the Graduate Community

There are many opportunities to be involved in the Boise community. Please visit their websites and explore these options:

Pre-professionalism: What Can You Do?

Academic Conferences

For those students interested in pursuing further graduate studies in English, it’s a good idea to look for opportunities to present your work at academic conferences.  There will often be opportunities for you to align research you are doing for a particular course with work that you might also be able to further develop and present at a regional or national conference.

A great resource for finding “calls for papers? is the CFP website maintained by the University of Pennsylvania: http://cfp.english.upenn.edu. Another possibility is http://www.papersinvited.com/ (Note: this is a commercial site that requires a subscription; they do offer a free trial, however.)

Regional graduate student conferences are also a viable option for pre-professionalism. For example, Brigham Young University’s English Society holds an annual graduate student conference and many other conferences are specifically for graduate students. These conferences are ideal for those who have not presented before.

Joining an Academic Listserv

Academic listservs can be a simple and easy way to keep in touch with the larger academic community.  Listservs will also often include calls for papers, so it is advisable to sign up for a listserv in your field if you are interested in attending and presenting at conferences.

When you sign up for a listserv, you are essentially connecting yourself with other scholars in your field via e-mail.  Every e-mail that is posted to a listserv is accessible to every member of that listserv – this way you can view and read the various questions posted by members of your scholarly community and see the answers that other scholars post in response.

The easiest way to find a listserv that interests you is to do a simple Google search for a listserv using a key term from your field with the word listserv.  So, a student interested in joining a listserv that discusses Hemingway would do a search for “Hemingway listserv.?  Another place to look for listservs is on the websites of organizations and conferences that align themselves with a specific author or field of literary studies.  For example, the North American Society for the Study of Romanticism hosts a listserv that can be found on their website.  Many other similar literary organizations also host a listserv through various universities.  The following are links to more general websites that include information on various listservs that may be of interest to you:   http://www.lsoft.com/lists/listref.html or  http://www.h-net.org/lists

Book Reviews

Many academic journals welcome graduate students as contributors of book reviews.  As you find out which academic journals are most helpful to you in your research, locate the website for the journal.  Many journals maintain on-line lists of the books that they receive and for which they need qualified reviewers.  Contact the Book Review editor of the journal and offer to review a particular title.  This is a great way to get published, begin to establish your expertise in the field, and get free books.

After the M.A.: Some Possibilities

Academic Possibilities

Graduates with an M.A. degree in English have found satisfying careers in many venues: as project managers and technical writers and editors, in various aspects of publishing and book editing and production, as teachers in private day and boarding schools, as instructors at community colleges, as adjunct faculty at BSU, among them.

The Career Center is a great resource for finding such positions on an individual basis and can also help you consider some of the many non-teaching-related and non-academic positions that value the skills someone with an M.A. in English possesses. Any career venue you may wish to pursue after your M.A. can be aided by their career planners. Another career resource, especially for teaching and other academic jobs is the job section of The Chronicle of Higher Education.

Still other graduates will continue their education either in Ph.D. programs, law school, or other forms of advanced study. To find a program that suits you best, there are several search options. The Career Center has collected a few online directories and sources available here and other sources include The Chronicle of Higher Education, Peterson’s graduate programs in the humanities, arts & social sciences., and College Source Search through the library. Consult the programs you are interested in to determine their individual requirements.

Resources for Non-Academic Careers